Santa Fe Springs wins Guttersnipe Award

Posted on | June 17, 2009 | No Comments

 

Dry season run-off trickles to a storm drain outside of the Santa Fe Springs offices of the Greater Los Angeles Vector Control District. Photo: Emily Green

Dry season run-off trickles to a storm drain outside of the Santa Fe Springs offices of the Greater Los Angeles Vector Control District. Photo: Emily Green

CONGRATULATIONS to the City of Santa Fe Springs and its water supplier, the Central Basin Municipal Water District. You are recipients of the first Chance of Rain Guttersnipe Award.

In fact, you inspired it.

This distinction goes exclusively to those who passively or aggressively promote dry-season run-off through the storm-drain system, pollution of the Pacific with said run-off, and the spread West Nile Virus by creating most excellent mosquito habitat in the sewer system.

While dry season run-off from sprinklers is so pervasive that most Southern Californian residences, city governments and water authorities are contenders, Santa Fe Springs and Central Basin win for sheer irony. The pictures right and below of a stream flowing through a  Santa Fe Springs gutter were taken outside of the Greater Los Angeles Vector Control District office.

At the same time  (about 1pm) inside the GLVCD offices, representatives from vector control offices across the state were meeting to discuss, among other things, how to curb dry season run-off to protect the public against mosquito-borne West Nile Virus.

Run-off traveling to the storm drain outside Great LA Vector Control District office, June 16, 2009, 1pmEvident source of run-off in Santa Fe Springs

Following the tide, its source appeared to be the sprinkler system of the immaculately groomed lawn of the District’s next-door-neighbor, Imperial Paving Co.

It should be stressed that if Imperial was the source of the run-off, it was still doing nothing illegal, other than looking pretty. Unlike in Los Angeles, San Diego and Santa Monica, conservation is elective in Santa Fe Springs. Rather than vote in strict conservation ordinances, it has opted for a “Shut your Tap” day promotion and “point, click” conservation tips on Central Basin’s website.

Judge for yourself how well point three “Make sure your sprinkler is placed so it only waters the lawn, not the pavement” is working.

 

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