Weed cloth always fails

One of the few things that weed cloth is good for is growing weeds. Fugitive dust settling in the gravel or wood mulch topping soon creates a potting mix perfect for rye grass, burclover or whatever seeds might blow in.

Rat-proofing row homes in Baltimore

Former mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake rat-proofed Baltimore's trash but left recycling for the vermin. This new receptacle by two of the city's most notable art welders and a Californian garden writer offers a prototype shed that could secure trash and recycling while eliminating visual blight caused by the bins.

Fourth year in the garden

The third in a series of photo essays on the progress and setbacks faced in taking over the remnant of an old California orchard.

Starve the lawn, not the tree

Well-intentioned reductions in lawn irrigation to conserve water can have catastrophic consequences for LA's urban canopy. The Urban Forestry Council and Barbara Eisenstein have the 411 for progressive tree care.

Avoiding pollution, drought’s evil twin

Drought has rewritten accepted orthodoxy about yard care. Among the things to do: water less often, more deeply. Rake. Compost. Squarely on the list of things not to do: fertilize, apply pesticides or use leaf blowers. Advice from a veteran garden writer about dry season good practice.
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    Emily Green by e-mail at emily.green [at] mac.com
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