After the Lawn Part 10: Better with less

Posted on | April 28, 2015 | No Comments

How many plants can a Southern California garden carry without relying on potable water? The short answer: Less. Go to KCET to see

Southern California was sold to the world as the place you can grow anything. Click on the site plan to be taken to KCET, where Part 10 of “After the Lawn” looks at what is actually possible for water-conscious gardeners. Image: Emily Green/KCET

 

After the Lawn Part 9: Greywater

Posted on | April 21, 2015 | No Comments

Retrofitting a house to disperse greywater to the landscape and it's possible  and outdoor irrigation could be met with a smart garden design. For more on greywater in the garden, click on the image to be taken to the KCET series "After the Lawn."

Retrofitting a house to disperse greywater combined with rainwater capture could meet irrigation needs of a well-considered California garden. To learn more, click on the image to be taken to the KCET series “After the Lawn.”

After the Lawn Part 8: Rain gardens

Posted on | April 14, 2015 | No Comments

As drought measures target garden irrigation, Southern California homes can replace lost water by landscaping in a way that harvests local rain. Click on the image to be taken to Part Eight of the KCET Series "After the Lawn."

As drought measures target garden irrigation, Southern California homes can replace lost water by landscaping in a way that harvests local rain. Click on the image to be taken to Part Eight of the KCET Series “After the Lawn.”

After the Lawn Part 7: Parkway Potential

Posted on | April 8, 2015 | No Comments

Placeholder ParkwayParkways are the last stop to catch rainfall from draining off a property and the first place that it could be imported from the street. Municipal protocols for what we can and should be doing on this front line of local water conservation are changing. What should someone in the middle of a rebate job do? Opt for a placeholder design (sample above) that is presentable and functional, but anticipate evolution into full-on rain garden (sample below). For more about the changing state of parkway regulations, go to Part 7 of the KCET series “After the Lawn.” Future Parkway

Whose water is it, anyway? Water rights 101

Posted on | April 7, 2015 | No Comments

South Delta farmer Rudy Mussi stands in front of his alfalfa field to demonstrate why California's oldest water rights holders should not have to meter long-traditional flood irrigation.

Who has the rights to the state’s water, in what order, for what, in what quantity, and under what terms, is an evolving construct. The above photo captures South Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay Delta farmer Rudy Mussi in front of his Roberts Island alfalfa field, where he posed to demonstrate why California’s oldest water rights holders should not have to meter traditional flood irrigation. He and fellow Delta farmers with long-held claims on the state’s water say their rights preempt those of 19 million Southern Californians also dependent on the Delta. To learn more about the California’s rapidly changing water law system, click on the image to be taken to KCET’s Bay Delta Project. Photo: Emily Green/KCET

 

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